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for city elective office." because that presumes that that person has not yet qualified, and that the purpose of the endeavor is to have them be a qualified candidate. it's not to support the election of the that person. it's really more about getting them to be a qualified candidate and i'm actually thinking less about the draft someone over the summer or draft someone as a written that actually happened in 1999 in ammiano for mayor. i recall some of that, but try not to recall all of it this sec. you could have the same efforts that happened with "run he had run," and progress for all," in the context of a write-in campaign and i'm not sure under this definition it would get captured. that is why i'm hung up on qualification versus election. >> may i ask you a question about that? >> sure. >> it's not clear to me why that is materially different from what we have? >> well, again it's not necessarily the election of a person. that is not necessarily the goal of the committee or the committee would assert that is not their goal. it's to get them to run and, in fact
to be a caretaker who was to fill the vacancy until the next election could be held. there were at least three sump committees, i think maybe four and some of them raised good sums of money. and my concern was that they were functioning as campaigns without actually being campaigns. the commission decided that they weren't campaigns under current law. but i think the commission agreed that the raising and spending of that size of money was not designed by the voters to be something that went unregulated. so the commission directed the staff to put together some provisions that would, as i said, regulate committed are designed to draft, particularly those that raise tangible sums of money. the reason for that is that a citywide campaign aimed at a single person still reaches people citywide, and would conceivably impact their decisions at the polling place based on the fact that you get someone to run for office by extolling their virtues. so these rectally simple to follow will treat under our law, such campaigns, such committees, excuse me, as primarily formed campaigns and therefore, report th
honorees at the white house. after that, pulling in the presidential election. then, an event about women in leadership. >> next, a tribute to this year's kennedy center honorees at the white house reception. individual awards are given to individuals for their lifetime achievement in performing arts. this year, best of hoffman and david letterman. -- dustin hoffman and david letterman. [applause] >> david letterman. >> natalia mackarova. [applause] >> led zepliln. [applause] -- led zeplin. ♪ >> ladies and of lead, the president of the united states and mrs. michelle obama. [applause] >> hello. hello. thank you. thank you. thank you so much. thank you. thank you. thank you. great. everybody please have a seat. thank you. good evening, everybody. you all look lovely. welcome to the white house on a night when i am no where close to being the main attraction. thank you, david rubenstein, michael kaiser, and the kennedy center trusties and everyone who has worked so hard to hold president kennedy's commitment to supporting the arts. i also want to recognize another one of president kennedy
the elections commission will finally say its final word on the results of the referendum. initially we were expecting this to be announced monday that there are clear delays. it is not clear are understood why. the hire elections commission could be under intense pressure from the opposition, which has been saying they need a final word or say on these allegations of fraud and irregularities that they documented throughout the two stages of the vote. toit could simply give merit the critics and what they have been saying, that this is simply arrest process and a higher elections commission and the judges were simply not prepared, that they did not have enough time to organize this a vote and deal with the result. >> still to come, supporters of hugo chavez of the venezuelan president will be back before the new year. but willie? we will have the latest. and we will tell you about the danger within the russian military forcing thousands of young men to become draft dodgers. >> recently there has been heavy downpours over many parts of sri lanka and it has given us a problem with flooding. th
. in the last week of the election, the obama campaign paid $550 for a single ad in raleigh, north carolina. the romney campaign had to sell out $2,665. the obama campaign bought it way ahead of time. lesson two, the republican brand needs a hard look. the gop favorable rating underwater for two years. it's been nearly five years and the final poll, full poll before the election, just 36% of registered voters said they had a positive view of the republican party. 43% held a negative view. the democratic party's favorable rating in positive territory. though just barely at 42%-40%. more than 20 republican primary debates put immigration on full display. so now as the party debates to modernize, it has to repair the image. and that leads us to lesson three. demographics are destiny. romney won a higher percentage of the white vote than any candidate since ronald reagan in 1994 beating obama among white voters. by 14 points among white women. five points among independents. he won all the groups by more than george w. bush did in 2004. but he lost the election by a wider margin than john kerry
in february's election. he said that he would consider running the government in the future. we have this from rome. >> available to lead italy again, if needed. on sunday, italy's former prime minister mario monti announced his plans after his resignation. >> i am not joining any specific party, but i would like the parties to take home these ideas. these ideas or any other ideas. we need to come up with ideas. and i hope the ideas here, contained in the manifesto, will be adopted by the vast majority of parliament. >> he will not run directly in the next election or side openly with any parties, but he says he would be ready to leave the country again. on one condition -- the next ruling party follow the strict plan of reform set to bring italy back onto the path of economic growth. monti was forced to resign on friday after former prime minister's silvio berlusconi's party withdrew its support. been criticized his pledge -- they criticize his pledge to retract some taxes he had budgeted last year. he returned here to the official prime minister's residence. whether he will be here after the
or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a sch
telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff negotiations have gone through the holidays, it certainly is perhaps a little bit more of a bully pulpit for the president and for his position on taxes. but i think the biggest story of the year came at the end of the year in the past week or so which is the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown and i think the presidency now might be shaped by those events and those are the stories that both barnicle and andrea have chose n as the top story. would you agree this could be a signature for the second term? >> i to do. i do agree with that. i think the events of a few days ago in newtown, connecticut, will help shape a good portion of the president's second and final term in office. i think it gives us a huge impe it tus to changes in this country that had had taken too long to take hold. i think the presidency itself, i think the man himself was shaped and altered
and i was running for office. we were in the same election, same ballot and it is easy as it is in san francisco politics to characterize people on either side of the aisle, and milton said "let me find out what this guy is about. let's talk" and that was very fitting because that's exactly how i knew him to operate as a public servant and a person. he wanted to talk about the china town campus and talk about my background. he asked if we should build a campus, and i said it's something that we should do and there was certainly overwhelming support for the campus, but characteristic of his style and his principles he was never afraid to question power, or to question the popular way, and he had many good points, and that was very typical of what i have known him to be as a servant at city college. it was very difficult in his position, often being the one vote out of seven, often finding rubber stamping of a decision, fighting the way we were spending our money for ten years. ten years he was in a position most of the time alone trying to speak up and say why are
ever win an election? >>guest: he was a senator. he was nominated at the constitutional convention of montgomery alabama. i don't take he did stand for election. but the confederate constitution it was a replica. there was no one term executive that may have spent a five-year to avoid reelection. >>host: professor mccurry was there a lot of political infighting during the war in the south? >> yes there was. the confederacy so quickly was on the ropes things that were planned never materialized. with the political opposition theoretically ever betty was a democrat. you could not vote for abraham lincoln. perhaps in virginia. and during the of war some were profoundly opposed on good grounds the davises ministrations was the most centralized federal a concentrated power in the entire american history. one looked at the union government and the structure of the state's and the confederacy and said that was the lead by a fine state. the united states never had a government that big until the new deal. fin day had to build this enormous central state. think of that. they passed taxes wi
's available to lead italy. he'll run for office in the upcoming election, but only for a party willing to push his agenda. >>> but he has competition in the form of sylvia berlusconi. he tells cnbc he feels a responsibility to run. >> feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party. >> and the crowds are out, the stores are ringing up those sales, but u.s. shoppers may be running low on holiday spirit. and analysts say that they're spending less, as well. hi, everybody. welcome. merry christmas out there. thank you for joining us here on the show. what we're looking at today, we've got slightly quiet markets ahead of the u.s. open. what we're seeing, though, that all the markets are being called lower across the board stateside. the dow is being called a bit lower, nasdaq is being called a bit lower and the s&p 500 being called down by a bybit, as well. we saw markets coming off on friday stateside. pretty significant drops, as well, given that we now seem to be a clashing of heads between the republicans and the demo
to be re-elected. >> that's right. they're going to need a lot of power going forward to get lngs through. >> we heard this on friday, we heard it on sunday from lapierre. he was using the terms "good guys" fairly frequently. does that positive association he's making with police officers, of those who are trained using gun, using the terms "good guys" is that what we expect to hear for all those who are opponents of gun legislation going forward? >> i think so. i think that will be part of the conversation. but, you know, this will be a really difficult battle on capitol hill, especially in the house but also in the senate. we see a lot of democrats up nor reelection in two years from more rural states so it might be difficult for them as well to fully embrace some of the issues being talked about or some of the policies going forward. so much we might see this in little bits of legislation. >> i was reading a number over 50% of those of the 113th who were put into office receive money from the nra. that would make things very difficult i would imagine as they are of course thinking abou
because they believed in this thing so strongly. and he said, i'd rather have lost the entire election and won the soldiers' vote than won the election and lost the soldiers. >> what about the scene where you, where the amendment is in doubt, lincoln himself seems skeptical that they're going to make it, and seward has been pushing him to be careful, not to let it be known that he's around town trying to rouse up votes. and they're in the theater and mary lincoln turns -- well, let's look at it. >> you think i'm ignorant of what you're up to because you haven't discussed this scheme with me as you ought to have done. when have i ever been so easily bamboozled? i believe you when you insist that amending the constitution and abolishing slavery will end this war and since you are sending our son into the war, woe into you if you fail to pass the amendment. >> seward doesn't want me leaving big muddy footprints all over town. >> no one has ever lived who knows better than you the proper placement of footfalls on treacherous paths. seward can't do it. you must. because if you fail to acqui
expect going up to the elections? >> parliamentary elections will still show this division but i do not think the islamists will get the majority this time. the opposition is trying to unify itself and offer economic progress and that is what the muslim brotherhood is doing. they are leading moral discussions and the people know they cannot beat freedom or sharia law. >> he has been a hugely controversial figure. how you think he will emerge? stronger or weaker? >> he seems to be strong after the constitutional referendum, but i'm afraid you will get weaker. not able to bring egyptians together and if he will not lead to more division in the country. egypt is on the verge of economic collapse. they need a strong leadership which is having confidence in political issues and that is what the muslim brotherhood is not having right now. >> do you think mohamed morsi is capable to leave them out of the economic crisis? >> he is not the right man at the moment because he does not seem to be president of the egyptians. >> and egyptian author and political scientists living in germany. than
of the ordinance by elected officials or department heads, but also those that come directly to us and don't go through the task force. is that right? >> i think this language was included just to make sure it was clear that any referral from the task force or in the off chance by the supervisor of record. this is not something that would come directly to the commission. >> but a referral, where the order of determination is a willful violation of a department head or an elected official would still go under chapter 3; right? >> correct. >> and this is just referring to allegations of non-willful. >> okay. >> so katherine is right in one aspect that the potential exists and the other part of this there was a concern that if something that staff was not a party of interest, if you will and a referral. so the only time that staff would be a party of interest is if we initiated the complaint and therefore, the executive director wouldn't have a role apart from providing you a legal recommendation on what was presented to him. that shows the intent of this. so that if a referral came allege
i see many of you here that became family. you were there all the time, working on elections, and after my dad ran you helped my brother run. the same people helping us, being part of the family, working together for the city. i remember some of the crazy things we did growing up in political life. going to i think it's call -- i don't know if it's called the muni lot or parking lot and where the buss are in the morning so we could put a handout on every seat and bus that was there. i remember standing out in front of markets and it was raining and horrible and saying "will you vote for my dad" and milton loved this. he loved this energy and out of most of us and showed in what he ended up doing. all three kids learned at an early age giving to other people was one of the main things we were put on this world to do. our mom and dad taught us that. milton was a true believer sometimes to his detriment and would take on any power he needed to be even if it meant being fired from the board and "you're not doing enough. you're not raising enough money". he would take
is to monitor them. and to make suggestions. in the most recent election with the activity taking place the civil-rights commission should have been at the center of the debate based on history, and experience in voting right suppression. it is nowhere to be seen. so what needs to happen it needs to be converted by the congress are they will get rid of it. >> what is the current makeup? >> it is bipartisan. eight members. four and four. no more than four of the same political party. but the they want to appoint somebody they have them change their party and then they appoint to them anyway. the way this structure is now because of ronald reagan, it is hard to get a majority to do anything constructive. they are not supposed to be people who are objective for mine tastes were those two are widely respected there will be aggressive or catering to their party. >>host: who is the chair? >> i have no idea. i've no idea what it is doing i assume nothing. it has been, since i left i have no idea. >>host: why did you leave in 2007? >>guest: my term would be up in january, said 2004. when bush w
presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in
skills. we thank the local state and federal offices before hosting an intern and we think of the elected officials for their continued leadership and for opening the door for mentoring are new leaders. please join me in congratulating and welcoming the internships class of 2012. will you please join me on stage? [applause] mayor, will you join us for a photograph, please? >> thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen. one more round of applause. [applause] if you look around you tonight, you will see poster board. celebrating, acknowledging, the first asian americans. we have the first asian-american actress in hollywood. the first asian-american nba player. the first members of congress. these interns are the future of our community. they are the reason why we are here today. we're also here to celebrate and recognize one of the greatest members of our community. this year it is the first year we are giving the lifetime achievement award. the lifetime achievement award this year is going to secretary norman manetta. he is a trailblazer. a man who paved the way for many of us. he was the
presentation by informing them that his poetry had been dedicated to the president-elect, mr. john finley [laughter] frost had inadvertently stated the name of a scholar from harvard. findlay new frost and may have been a friend of frost. but he was no jack kennedy. [laughter] here's a picture of washington's inauguration the first one in 79 that place in the capitol at the time. the next inaugurations took place in philadelphia and the first one in washington was in 1801. now there is a mess, a legend of the george washington so help me god at the end of the los. but there is no proof that he said that. out of the four words at the time it's come to be a tradition at least from 1933 to the present those words have been added at the end of the los. this is 1929 coming in on the left is the chief justice william howard taft and he is administering the oath of office to the new president herbert hoover. he's the only person ever to be both president and chief justice and you're supposed to say preserve, protect and defend the constitution that he said cruisers, maintain and defend and this
. becoming the first japanese-american elected to both houses of congress. he was the second-longest serving senator in us history. inouye received the medal of honor for his heroism in world war two. president barack obama and several other dignitaries >> firefighters had to battle an early morning fire at a commercial building in china. smoke could be seen pouring out of the building which is used for apartments as well as a hotel. authorities say everyone escaped the building except for a security guard. who conditions are currently >> thousands of people rallied in india. angry over a recent gang rape and beating of a young woman. as well as how the government handles rape cases. for the second straight day riot police used water cannons on the crowds that gathered in new delhi. the water sent some protesters running but others refused to move. authorities insist that they're taking action to protect women. >> egypt's leading opposition party says that it is planning to appeal the results of the country's recent constitutional election. claiming that the results are not legitimate. ian l
the election. >> on taxes, i know it's hard for republicans but the president ran on the platform. 250. no tax increase for people below but taxes for people above. he won. 60% of voters said they were for it in exit polls including republicans. >> wake of house speaker john boehner's plan "b" failure, all eyes turn to senate leaders harry reid and mitch mcconnell and whether they work out something short of $4 trillion grand bargain. last-minute stop gap. attending tax cut for people making $250,000 or less. and unemployment benefits for 2 million people who will lose the benefits a week after christmas. >> it is going to be a patch. because in four days we can't solve everything. >> yet, other republicans note the president short-term fix raises some taxes, yet punt spending cuts until next year. >> i would vote for revenue, including the tax rate hike though i don't like them to get, to save the country from becoming greece. i'm not going to set aside the $1.2 trillion in cuts. >> if the president does return to washington this week, unclear whether he will come back here to hawaii for new
republican votes in the house. he would get an absolute majority and would not be elected speaker in the first round. >> robert williams says that we need to cut spending. sequestration was a democratic deal. deal with it. guest: i would call that a deal between the republican congress and president. the whole point of sequestration, if we remember, was not to have to take effect. the point was to have such a bad outcome that the super committee that was created in the august 2011 debt ceiling deal be so afraid of the sequestration that they would reach a bipartisan compromise that would reduce deficits by the same amount that sequestration was expected to, but in a much more balanced and sensible way. democrats and republicans were unable to reach an agreement and that is why you have this sequestration. sequestration was never intended to be policy. it was intended to be so bad and foolish than democrats and republicans would be forced to agree to something. obviously, that calculation perhaps mistook the level of disagreement there was between republicans and democrats on this
the moment he is elected half the people don't like him. so he is going to have -- he is a human being and going to make mistakes. i am praying for our president because i believe that the bible tells us to do so. >> chris: what do you think has been his biggest accomplishment and what are you most disappointed about over these last four years? >> i don't know what the biggest accomplishment would be. i don't know that. my biggest disappointment is the disunity. president obama ran saying i'm going to be a unifier and our molestation is more divided than ever before. i think it is more divided than at any time since the civil war. that is disheartening to me. >> chris: he would say i have tried and you had mitch mcconnell say in 2010 our number one objective is to make him a one term president. how much is he responsible for that? how much is it everybody else in washington? >> i don't blame simply the president. i think there is plenty of blame to go around. i would say this. we need to stop blaming. you can't fix the problem while you are fixing the blame. i have trained leaders lite
, though, they went more and more public, appearing on television and also pressing their own elected representative, especially their congresswoman to really push hard against the mexican government for an early release. their goal was to get him home by christmas, and they've achieved that goal. heather, back to you. heather: we are glad they're going to spend the holiday together. thank you very much. and a little background, by the way, on john hammer's arrest. it was august 13. he was enroute to costa rica with a friend when he was detained by mexican customs who claimed that he had an incorrect permit for an antique rifle that he had in the his possession. well, the friends that he was traveling were -- with were also detained but released shortly after. four months later on december 17th, the first photo was anonymously e-mailed to his father. two days ago hammer was released when a mexican judge ruled in the his favor, and he was then driven across the border into texas. that same night his father anxiously waited for him. john hammer spent a total of 132 days behind bars. gre
wall street doesn't want you to know. plus, it goes down as the most expensive election in history. the role dollars and donations played in the race to the white house. and, americans spent a staggaring amount of money at the box office this year. a look at what we watched. but first, matt shapiro, president of mws capital, joins us now for a look back at the standout stocks of 2012. good to have you on the show this morning. > > thanks a lot angie. > definitely facebook was the leader of the pack. it was the third largest ipo ever, and one of the worst opening days ever. > > what a typical disaster for today's vacuous electronic markets. but, if you held off, remember, it was $18.75 before its last earnings report, and bounced all the way up. so, not only was it the worst ipo, but, it was a story rebound stock. and it's kind of the age of 2012, was these big tech stocks. which one do you buy and where do you buy it? > there were good times and bad for apple. at one point it was the must-own stock, and then it was "you must sell quickly before the end of the year and take home you
number seven executive's officer's report. >> miss miller. >> we have election of officers in january -- i really don't have a report unless you want to talk about the joint hearing that we had with the sf puc. we are looking for dates in february for the next one but other than that that concludes my reports. >> commissioners, any comments or questions? >> any member of the public what would like to speak? seeing none public comment is closed and i'm not sure when to make this throat, but as i. >> >> understand it this is our last lafco meeting of calendar year and because of that it probably is the last meeting that we will have commissioner olague sitting in as a member of lafco for at least for the time being, and so i just -- on a very personal note i want to take this opportunity to thank commissioner olague for her service on the local agency formation commission. it really has been an honor and you have provided a tremendous contribution. i think it's definitely the case that community choice aggregation would not be where it is today without your support and involvement, a
commission. :good evening dale pillpa, just wanted to comment and perhaps inquire on the election season that has just concluded. i assume that the staff will be analyzing the effectiveness of the matching -- the public finance program and perhaps compiling a report and i'm just wondering what the thinking is on the timing for that? it's usually a few months down the road, but given the various things that happened this cycle, i believe it will be interesting to look at the numbers after the fact and maybe we can have some discussion at that time about the program and how it works given what we anticipated about a year-ago going into this cycle. i don't know if staff has an indication of when that mike be happening. >> a few months. >> thanks. next item on the agenda is discussion and possible action on the amendments to the ordinance. >> nobody is a stranger to the subject matter in front of us. the commission made some progress and combing through input from the sunshine ordinance task force and the staff's updated and redirected recommendations and then once again, after the last
on elections? think of the people that could benefit from that money. >> there have been two elections since i have been in america. two elections where one party has had far more financial firepower. one was with meg whitman and one was with romney. the most money lost. >> isn't that great? >> what does that tell you? >> the people are getting smarter. they're going, i don't like this amount of money spent on this election. there should be a given -- campaign finance reform is very important. i hope somebody does something about it. you should have a given amount, equal amount, equal air time. that's it. you know? that idea of corporations being people, no, no. this is a country of, by and for the people. not of, by and for the corporation. you know? it's like because i'm so against gmos, the modified food and i'm so against lobbying, you know, like chemical companies lobbying and proposition 37 was bad. that's scary. the poison in our foods and in the air and pollution. they give discretionary polluters -- we are having climate change. the republicans don't seem to want to acknowledge that.
. >> what was difficult is he did not run on the abolitionist ticket. he would not have been elected had he run as an abolitionist. he had an urge from his very young years that slavery was an atrocity. but from the beginning when the war first started, he could not let the border states secede and go south. because he couldn't let that happen, he pretty much put on a political theater, meaning he said what had to be said to calm the border states down and before the secession of the southern rebels, he tried very, very hard to prevent them from leaving by pretty much telling them anything they wanted to hear. but in his heart, in the deepest reaches of abraham lincoln, he knew slavery had to be abolished at the very beginning of his term. >> was it a a difficult decision zeroing on one part of his life? >> really difficult decision because doris's book is brilliant. she was sending me chapters back as far as 2003. there were so many highlights in lincoln's presidency. but for a movie audience -- for a mini series it would have been one template. for a movie audience, i thought to get to kn
lady attended the memorial service. he was the first japanese american elected to both houses of congress and the second largest serving u.s. senator. he was 88 years old. >> back here in maryland a police shooting in baltimore county, a police officer opened fire, killing a man who had a knife. that's where derrick is tonight with the details. >> reporter: police say the officer was acting in self- defense when he confronted and shot a suspicious man he found back here behind this gas station. it all started with an officer on routine patrol as he passed the shell gas station at ed monton around 3:45 in the morning. he noticed a suspicious man behind the building. police say when the officer asked the man to come out from behind the building, the man pulled out a knife. >> the officer attempted to use a taser to stop the situation, but it was ineffective. the man refused repeated commands to drop the knife. >> reporter: police say fearing for his safety, the officer shot the man to the chest. he has been identified. he died from the
election that i think has huge potential to be participants and be excited about this program and young communities of color and different kinds of communities that before hadn't been as engaged, and it seems like a way to engage and educate those communities that really around social media, and i saw in here there is a big focus working with cbo's and operating their networks, but i would love to see something in here that social media is going to be maximized, what that looks like, whatever the plan is and i know for me and i'm not the emerging demographic and i'm not home much but to reach that constituency we have to maximize the tools which they respond to. i would love to see that as part of the plan. >> all right. we will highlight that more. we have a website. you're certainly aware of the public utilities commission twitter and facebook and other social media activities and cleanpower sf will certainly be engaging in all of those activities. i think maybe it could be highlighted better in the budget section certainly where we're talking about how we're funding some of this m
and you will like it. you know what it reminds me of? elections have consequences. i won. it's not a nice tack to the center where i'm going to govern for all of you. are you coming back? >> i'm going to. >> the jacket is coming off, though, right? >> christmas eve and i'm celebrating. as you know, we had the tree going this weekend with the lights on. >> that's so nice. there's one other thing i sought on that thing over the weekend that you brought us that i was going do -- oh,no. did you see mitt romney did not want to run? >> i saw that. that was in the boston globe. that was a great piece worth reading. then he found out how bad things were going on his ipad. >> yeah. but maybe he didn't want to run because there were times i really kind of thought it looked like he didn't want to run. >> yeah, but towards the end, i thought he did. >> he tried hard. thanks. >> okay. >> come over here. >>> in other news, a dock worker strike on the atlantic and coast could be just days away. port operators have been negotiating with the long shoreman association since march. but the two sides are sai
? >> well, you know, you get the elected officials you deserve. and they -- and i know this, i'm a politician. they respond to pressure. and they respond to incentives. and unless, so we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany or city hall, but we can organize. we have the power to exercise pressure, demands, influence on our elected officials. and so we have to get much more active if we're going to have a society that's going to respond to this enduring problem. the rate of child poverty in the united states of america we should be shamed that a nation this strong has child poverty and that kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, few traditionally-fit to learn -- nutritionally-fit to learn, materially ready to learn. and that's the lie, or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and they say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to our flag, that that phrase, "liberty and justice for all,"
who might be skittish on that. it's also a fair number of moderate democrats who are up for re-election in the next cycle, 2014, who are from red states, who simply will not even talk to reporters about the idea, much less endorse the idea of supporting any kind of new gun control measures yet. >> even now. you would -- well, i'm being naive, i know. if you have strong feelings about it, after what newtown happened, don't constituents want to know what their legislators think? why not just embrace what you think even if you say, well, i don't think gun control laws should be put into place in america. >> if i told you it was tough politics, would you be shocked? that that's the reason why. but in all fairness, i think that the political realities and the fact it is politically tough, despite what happened in newtown for a lot of politicians to do anything to anger the gun rights enthusiasts. and we're talking about, as you reported, a 4 million member organization, it's tough for them to do that. i think also, everybody is just trying to kind of work through what could be possible legis
, this story kind of really blew my mind here. no one saw this coming. some post-election comments from inside mitt romney's family, the comments raising a lot of political eyebrows. his son gave an interview to "the boston globe," the newspaper, and unexpected is definitely the word. we'll get into that coming up in just a second. >>> also coming up, the controversial call on "wheel of fortune" that has viewers and a contestant expressing outrage. hear what happened during a final round of the game show that led to disappointment, to say the least. it all has to do with how you pronounce a word. >> being punished for her southern accent. i don't like that. i think she has a legit case. we'll get to that. >>> coming up later, the hollywood heartbreak story that won't reach its final chapter. demi moore's latest divorce demand from ashton kutcher. quite an eye opener. details on that and much more celebrity goodness coming up. stay tuned for that. >>> but first, hundreds of people held a candle light vigil on new york's brooklyn bridge in honor of those who died in the connecticut school shooti
and the election hangover. new comments from one of mitt romney's sons that you might describe as puzzling. what do they really mean? and the gun battle rages on. new reports on why nothing may get done even after the sandy hook tragedy. >>> a massive tax hike and spending cuts -- republicans and democrats continue to point fingers in opposite directions, hinting that talks could go into the new year. >> are we going over the cliff? >> i believe we are, and i think the president is eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. he senses a victory at the bottom of the cliff. >> we only have nine days left here. when are we going to get serious about actual solutions? i would welcome john to tell me. he says he wants a solution. give us one, john. >> meanwhile, president obama is spending christmas in hawaii where he and the first lady attended the holiday memorial service for the late u.s. senator from daniel inouye. >> white house correspondent kristen welker. kristen, obviously they always say the white house travels with the president wherever he is. that's where the white house is. the pres
hello, tom. it is exciting times in tripoli. with election and new congress coming together. as i read libya's recent history it is a bit like we are reliving the post world war ii years. how right he was. that was chris. always thinking, always sharp, always ready. public service is too often looked down upon by some in this country. often my colleagues in the foreign service la meant they don't make them the way they used to anymore. today we remember a man, chris stevens, whose life and service just proves how wrong my colleagues really are. chris shows us they still make them the way they used to, only an awful lot better, thank you. [applause] >> chris's family would like to invite everyone to a reception after the ceremony. it will be held over there. you are all welcome. let us pray. oh lord, support us all the day long until the shadows lengthen and the evening comes and the busy world is hushed and the fever of life is over and our work is done. then in your mercy grant us a safe lodging and a holy rest and peace at the last. may the author of all life bless us and keep us. in
't and it makes my job easier when our people in the community want to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage month here in san francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and
your presence into here city hall. i know the broadcasting world is happy from the election results last night and we can continue to deliver programming for our communities. [applause] and i know we were inspired by the president's words last night when we talked about the importance of diversity and here in san we are no stranger to that language when we celebrate all the different communities we have here in san francisco and the filipino and native american community here in san francisco. we continue to build upon our city's long standing history and celebrate diversity and multiculturalism as a part of our lives and here we celebrating the american indian and enriches the great history of our city. these events are special to us and gives us the opportunity to recognize the unsung heroes whose work goes unnoticed and it's an opportunity to share with the larger community and i would like to thank the native american organizing community and the health center, the health center of santa clara, our office and i would like to make a special note of one of our employees who has
. in total, 16 states have passed restrictive voting laws that could shape the 2012 election, including the vital swing states of florida and pennsylvania. well, on monday, naacp president and ceo ben jealous made voting rights the center of his address to the group's annual convention in houston. >> we have a choice to make. we can allow this election to be stolen in advance, as politicians from pennsylvania and recently bragged about money thought no one was listening. talking about his state's voter id law. we can double down on democracy. and overcome the rising tide of voter suppression with a higher daughter of voter registration and mobilization and activation and protection. amy goodman: well, today we're joined by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote: 13-term democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia. he was a leader of the civil rights movement who marched side by side with dr. martin luther king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize the fre
come off the dow very similar to what we saw after the election when we don't get a deal. this comes home. people don't realize what this is going to do. this is not healthy. this is not good. so what we're going to get is this wakeup call and i think people are getting a gift right now, opening the screens, take some off the table. at least place protective stops so you know where you will get out. >> rick santelli, is that how you read the message of the market right now? >> you know, i think the market's major movement with regard to the lack of a solution on the fiscal cliff has been more of what we've seen not more of what we think we're going to see. i'm referring specifically to some of the special dividends, some of the tax issues, some of the buy backs, some of the way, you know, states and trusts are being manipulated and moved to deal with the potential worst case scenarios. i think in terms of the market our guests just referred to some of the volatility. you know, as congress called it a day or as the boehner bill didn't pass the plan b. but i remember the t.a.r.p. vote.
. >> schieffer: how long have you been in the congress gijust got elected to my second term, have been in public office for 18 years serving the good people throughout south carolina. >> schieffer: let me ask you first about the whole business with the national rifle association. their idea seems basically to be just add armed security to all of our nations' schools. do you think that's feasible or is it a good idea? >> the president has just established a committee to take a serious, holistic look at what we need to do as a nation to make sure that our kids are safe. to rush to judgment, i think, is a bit premature on what we should do. i think after we have the commit's report, we should take a very serious look at whatever it takes to keep our kids safe at school. we don't know what that is yet. we're just finishing the week of so many funerals, we should-- we should continue to pray for the family members. >> schieffer: but would you be in favor of changing some laws, like, for example, banning these assault weapons? >> i would love to see what comes out of the committee. i think with vice p
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